IN THIS LIST

China's Onshore Equities Beyond Large Caps: The S&P China A MidCap 500 Index

From Countryside to Capital Markets: The S&P/ASX Agribusiness Index

Global Sector Primer Series: Financials

InsuranceTalks: An Enhanced Approach to Managing Risk

Driving toward a Greener Future

China's Onshore Equities Beyond Large Caps: The S&P China A MidCap 500 Index

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John Welling

Director, Global Equity Indices

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Michael Orzano

Senior Director, Global Equity Indices

Introduction

The S&P China A MidCap 500 Index seeks to provide representative exposure to mid-sized China A-shares while requiring positive earnings for index constituents and excluding sanctioned securities.  The index composition provides differentiated exposure when compared to the large-cap-focused S&P China A 300 Index due to the unique characteristics of the mid-cap size category. 

In this overview, we will explore why one may want to consider mid-cap China A-shares, including:

  • Their limited representation in conventional China and emerging market benchmarks;
  • The size and scope of the opportunity set;
  • Differentiated investment characteristics and high return dispersion compared to large-cap A-shares; and
  • A combination of both large-cap and mid-cap exposure provides broader coverage across sectors.

The methodology of the S&P China A MidCap 500 Index offers some additional potential benefits, including:

  • A profitability requirement to eliminate companies lacking a track record of generating positive earnings; and
  • The exclusion of sanctioned securities.

The Size and Scope of China A-Shares

While Chinese equities have grown in importance for international market participants, A-shares are limited to partial inclusion factors within broad benchmarks, leaving them significantly underrepresented in conventional Chinese and emerging market indices.  Without representative inclusion of A-shares, China-specific exposure within indices could be considered incomplete.

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From Countryside to Capital Markets: The S&P/ASX Agribusiness Index

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Izzy Wang

Analyst, Strategy Indices

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Jason Ye

Director, Strategy Indices

Introduction

Agriculture is the foundation of our society.  It provides food to support human’s daily nutrition needs and is the main source of raw materials such as cotton, wood and leather that are critical to major industries in the economy.  The United Nations (UN) has set “end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” as a global policy in its Sustainable Development Goals. By 2050, the global population is estimated to grow to 9.6 billion, demanding at least a 70% increase in food supply. While the growing population is driving demand for agricultural products, climate change, geopolitical risk and water scarcity are threatening the global food supply chain.  Most recently, the Russia-Ukraine conflict has cast immediate damage to global food supply, causing a food price increase in 2022. Since 2020, the World Bank Agriculture Price Index has increased by 52% (see Exhibit 1).

From Countryside to Capital Markets: The S&P/ASX Agribusiness Index - Exhibit 1

Australia is a major producer of many agricultural products, including wheat, wool and beef.  Its agribusiness is a vital contributor to the domestic economy, and Australia itself is a key export country in the global market.  The diversified climate and soil conditions in Australia can sustain a wide range of agricultural businesses including livestock, crops, fruit and vegetables, fisheries, and forest (see Exhibit 2).  More than half of the land and about one-quarter of the water in Australia are used in the agriculture industry. Of the agricultural production, 70% is exported to other countries, accounting for 12% of Australia’s export earnings in 2020-2021. In 2020, Australia’s sheep meat export ranked first, and its beef export ranked second in the world.

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Global Sector Primer Series: Financials

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Hector Huitzil Granados

Analyst, Global Equity Indices

Introduction

The Global Industry Classification Standard® (GICS®) assigns companies to a single classification at the sub-industry level according to their principal business activity using quantitative and qualitative factors, including revenues, earnings and market perception.  The sector is the first level of the four-tiered, hierarchical industry classification system that includes 11 sectors, 24 industry groups, 69 industries and 158 sub-industries.  The classification standard is in constant evolution to ensure that it reflects the current state of industries globally.

The Financials sector includes, but is not limited to:

  • Companies with conventional banking operations;
  • Insurance and reinsurance brokerage firms;
  • Financial exchanges and providers of financial decision support tools and products, including rating agencies;
  • Institutions that provide consumer finance services;
  • Investment management and brokerage firms;
  • Firms providing mortgage and mortgage-related services; and
  • Companies with significantly diversified holdings across three or more sectors, none of which contribute a majority of profit or sales.

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InsuranceTalks: An Enhanced Approach to Managing Risk

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Phillip Brzenk

Head of Multi-Asset Indices

Insurance Talks is an interview series where insurance industry thinkers share their thoughts and perspectives on a variety of market trends and themes impacting indexing.

Phillip Brzenk is Head of Multi-Asset Indices at S&P Dow Jones Indices (S&P DJI). His team is responsible for the product management of multi-asset and option indices, which cover a variety of outcome-oriented index solutions including managed volatility, retirement, dynamic allocation, inflation hedging, sustainability, and absolute return.

S&P DJI: Following the 2008 Global Financial Crisis (GFC), many investors with longer-term time horizons and liabilities found themselves more averse to volatility. How did this give rise to the S&P Risk Control Indices?

Phil: The GFC brought significant disruption to the markets, with U.S. equities (as measured by the total return of the S&P 500®) dropping over 55% from Oct. 9, 2007, to March 9, 2009. In addition, correlations between asset classes increased, reducing potential diversification benefits normally associated with standard allocation strategies. Coming out of the crisis, there was a clear need to develop a systematic asset allocation framework that could react quickly to changing market conditions, with a particular focus on controlling volatility—and with that, S&P DJI was a pioneer in the market when we launched the first  S&P Risk Control Indices in 2009.

S&P DJI: Some practitioners might ask, why manage risk when it can be avoided?

Phil: The S&P Risk Control Indices attempt to give asset class exposure to equities and cash (Risk Control 1 [RC]) or equities and Treasury bonds (Risk Control 2 [RC2]) for potential long-term return premium over short-term cash. The index series incorporates a reactionary asset allocation framework that shifts between the asset classes in order to target a specific volatility target percentage. While volatility is not precisely equivalent to risk, having a volatility target enables participants to match their appetite for risk taking. The asset allocation framework and volatility target in S&P DJI’s risk control indices have historically enabled them to achieve reduced tail risk and higher risk-adjusted returns compared to standard equity exposure.

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Driving toward a Greener Future

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Jason Ye

Director, Strategy Indices

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Izzy Wang

Analyst, Strategy Indices

Executive Summary

Climate change is disrupting the global economy and affecting everyone. The transition from fossil fuel vehicles to electric vehicles (EVs) is often considered a critical step in decarbonizing the global transportation system. The adoption of EVs has accelerated over the past few years. Since 2012, global EV sales have grown at a CAGR of 56%. In 2021, sales doubled from the previous year, hitting a record high of 6.75 million units (see Exhibit 1). Going forward, restrictions or even banning the production of fossil fuel vehicles, the tax credits for purchasing EVs, growing preference for EVs among young consumers, and billions of investments in EV charging infrastructure could continue to boost the supply and demand of electric vehicles. For market participants, this global structural shift from traditional engine vehicles to EVs represents meaningful opportunities.

Exhibit 1: Global Electric Vehicle Sales Have Had Rapid Growth

An Electric Era Is Coming

More than 20 countries have announced their intention to fully phase out new sales of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles over the next 30 years, with many targeting zero carbon emissions by 2050.  The U.K. is set to ban new sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2035.  The U.S. government has set a target for half of new auto sales to be electric by 2030, with a USD 7.5 billion package to roll out charging stations across the country.  Meanwhile, leading traditional automakers are pivoting toward EV manufacturing.  General Motors has set an aggressive goal to exclusively produce EVs by 2035, and Ford announced it would target 40% of its vehicle production to be EVs by 2030.  To meet the stated targets of all countries, the International Energy Agency’s forecast shows that global EV sales would need to increase to 25 million vehicles by 2030, representing 15% of the market share.

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